Sep
22
8:00pm 8:00pm

THEMA TALKS: NIKOLA MARINCIC

  ABOUT: If quantum physics could talk to us about architecture, what would it say? Questions like this, as strange as they might sound, are far from being a fantasy in the context of contemporary mathematical and computational modelling. Within the paradigm of communication, we will ask architecture a question that it cannot answer alone, but get our answer nevertheless. The realisation of this possibility should help us reach another level of abstraction, from which the notion of architectural model could be reconsidered and expanded. BIO: Nikola Marinčić is a postdoctoral researcher at the chair for Computer-Aided Architectural Design at ETH Zurich. He earned a PhD from the ETH, with a thesis entitled "Towards communication in CAAD: Spectral Characterisation and Modelling with Conjugate Symbolic Domains" in 2017. He graduated as an architect from the Faculty of Architecture in Belgrade, and completed a Masters of Advanced Studies programme in Architecture and Information at ETH Zurich in 2011. In 2012-13 he was a guest researcher at the Future Cities Laboratory, interdisciplinary research program of the Singapore ETH Centre for Global Environmental Sustainability.

 

ABOUT:
If quantum physics could talk to us about architecture, what would it say? Questions like this, as strange as they might sound, are far from being a fantasy in the context of contemporary mathematical and computational modelling. Within the paradigm of communication, we will ask architecture a question that it cannot answer alone, but get our answer nevertheless. The realisation of this possibility should help us reach another level of abstraction, from which the notion of architectural model could be reconsidered and expanded.

BIO:
Nikola Marinčić is a postdoctoral researcher at the chair for Computer-Aided Architectural Design at ETH Zurich. He earned a PhD from the ETH, with a thesis entitled "Towards communication in CAAD: Spectral Characterisation and Modelling with Conjugate Symbolic Domains" in 2017. He graduated as an architect from the Faculty of Architecture in Belgrade, and completed a Masters of Advanced Studies programme in Architecture and Information at ETH Zurich in 2011. In 2012-13 he was a guest researcher at the Future Cities Laboratory, interdisciplinary research program of the Singapore ETH Centre for Global Environmental Sustainability.

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Aug
30
8:00pm 8:00pm

THEMA TALKS: MIRO ROMAN

thema miro.jpg

ABOUT:
Void or How to Deal with a LOT

A lot of images, architectural blogs, Dezeen, ArchDaily, internet, public space, fashion, Tokyo, Vetements, Barad, brand, void, measurement, empty center, data, 10 years of online architectural publishing, 300 000 images, a weather prognosis, a cloud, an architectural mutant, flavors of contemporary architecture, avatars… dive right into it; filter, search, crawl, articulate. Use machine learning. Write a poem, or code a couple of them. Make sense of what is in fashion now. Compose your own “online mask” - play with information.


BIO:
Miro Roman is an architect, a researcher, an artist, a designer, and none from the stated. His main focus is at the overlap of information technologies and architectural articulations.
Miro holds a Master of Advanced Studies degree in Computer Aided Architectural Design from ETH Zurich, and a Master in Architecture degree from the University of Zagreb. Since 2004 he is collaborating with Luka Vlahović on project romanvlahovic. From 2013 to 2015 he was a part of the Future Cities Laboratory, interdisciplinary research programme of the Singapore ETH Centre for Global Environmental Sustainability (SEC). Currently he is a PHD researcher at the Chair of CAAD at ETH Zürich.

http://miro.romanvlahovic.com/

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Aug
23
8:00pm 8:00pm

THEMA TALKS: ELISA BERTUZZO

ABOUT: RECUPERATING FIELDWORK: UNTOLD STORIES FROM THE GANGES DELTA What is fieldwork? A race against time; full-immersion in the lives of dozens of people, and peculiar solitude; cognition and self-experience; planning and implementing. To me, fieldwork has always also meant a confrontation with personal and practical shortcomings—those that generally are avoided and eventually vanish in the written, said, explained, interpreted of an ethnographer. For once, this practice shall be inverted: I’ll focus the instances of speechlessness and failure of a long phase of research in Bangladesh and West Bengal, thus recuperating stories that I couldn’t, or wouldn’t, tell. In search of images less seen, and voices less heard, from the region. BIO: Elisa T. Bertuzzo is a cultural scientist based in Berlin. She has published on issues such as perception and representation of space, urbanisation in South Asia, ethnography, the correlations of formality/informality, as well as on Lefebvre's theory of production of space. In her forthcoming monograph, Archipelagos: Urbanisation told by people-on-the-move, she focuses movement and translocalisation in, from and around Bangladesh and West Bengal (India).

ABOUT:

RECUPERATING FIELDWORK: UNTOLD STORIES FROM THE GANGES DELTA
What is fieldwork? A race against time; full-immersion in the lives of dozens of people, and peculiar solitude; cognition and self-experience; planning and implementing. To me, fieldwork has always also meant a confrontation with personal and practical shortcomings—those that generally are avoided and eventually vanish in the written, said, explained, interpreted of an ethnographer. For once, this practice shall be inverted: I’ll focus the instances of speechlessness and failure of a long phase of research in Bangladesh and West Bengal, thus recuperating stories that I couldn’t, or wouldn’t, tell. In search of images less seen, and voices less heard, from the region.


BIO:

Elisa T. Bertuzzo is a cultural scientist based in Berlin. She has published on issues such as perception and representation of space, urbanisation in South Asia, ethnography, the correlations of formality/informality, as well as on Lefebvre's theory of production of space. In her forthcoming monograph, Archipelagos: Urbanisation told by people-on-the-move, she focuses movement and translocalisation in, from and around Bangladesh and West Bengal (India).

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Jun
21
8:00pm 8:00pm

Thema Talk: Cord Riechelmann

Join us for the sixth session of Thema Talks with Cord Riechelmann.   Cord Riechelmann, born in Celle in 1960, studied biology and philosophy at the Freie Universität Berlin. He was lecturer for the social behavior of primates and the history of biological research. He also worked as a columnist and Stadtnaturreporter for "Berliner Seiten" of the Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung. His main interest is the living conditions of nature in the culture of urban living spaces.

Join us for the sixth session of Thema Talks with Cord Riechelmann.

 

Cord Riechelmann, born in Celle in 1960, studied biology and philosophy at the Freie Universität Berlin. He was lecturer for the social behavior of primates and the history of biological research. He also worked as a columnist and Stadtnaturreporter for "Berliner Seiten" of the Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung. His main interest is the living conditions of nature in the culture of urban living spaces.

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Jun
14
7:30pm 7:30pm

Quote Club

Join us for the fifth session of Quote Club where we will delve into different readings of MULTISPECIES. We will read two texts: Nature's Queer Perfomativity by Karen Barad and Bringing Things to Life: Creative Entanglements in a World of Material by Tim Ingold. Excerpts from selected texts will be provided in the space and can be found here: www.kulturfolger.ch/read-me/

Join us for the fifth session of Quote Club where we will delve into different readings of MULTISPECIES. We will read two texts: Nature's Queer Perfomativity by Karen Barad and Bringing Things to Life: Creative Entanglements in a World of Material by Tim Ingold. Excerpts from selected texts will be provided in the space and can be found here: www.kulturfolger.ch/read-me/

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Jun
9
8:00pm 8:00pm

Thema Talk: Eva Franch I Gilabert

Join us for Kulturfolger's fifth session of Thema Talks with Eva Franch I Gilabert. Eva Franch is an architect, curator, educator and lecturer of experimental forms of art and architectural practice. Franch specializes in the making of alternative architecture histories and futures. Since 2010, Franch is the Chief Curator and Executive Director of Storefront for Art and Architecture in New York. Franch has taught at Columbia University GSAPP, the IUAV University of Venice, SUNY Buffalo, and Rice University School of Architecture. Franch has taught and lectured internationally on art, architecture, and the importance of alternative practices in the construction and understanding of public life at educational and cultural institutions. Franch has received numerous awards and fellowships, and her work has been exhibited internationally including FAD Barcelona, the Venice Architecture Biennale, the Vitra Design Museum, and the Shen-zen Architecture Biennale, among others. Recent publications by Franch include Agenda (Lars Muller, 2014) and Atlas (Lars Muller, 2015) both as part of OfficeUS. An upcoming publication, the OfficeUS Manual will be published in 2017.

Join us for Kulturfolger's fifth session of Thema Talks with Eva Franch I Gilabert.

Eva Franch is an architect, curator, educator and lecturer of experimental forms of art and architectural practice. Franch specializes in the making of alternative architecture histories and futures. Since 2010, Franch is the Chief Curator and Executive Director of Storefront for Art and Architecture in New York.

Franch has taught at Columbia University GSAPP, the IUAV University of Venice, SUNY Buffalo, and Rice University School of Architecture. Franch has taught and lectured internationally on art, architecture, and the importance of alternative practices in the construction and understanding of public life at educational and cultural institutions.

Franch has received numerous awards and fellowships, and her work has been exhibited internationally including FAD Barcelona, the Venice Architecture Biennale, the Vitra Design Museum, and the Shen-zen Architecture Biennale, among others. Recent publications by Franch include Agenda (Lars Muller, 2014) and Atlas (Lars Muller, 2015) both as part of OfficeUS. An upcoming publication, the OfficeUS Manual will be published in 2017.

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May
31
8:00pm 8:00pm

Thema Talk: QUentin Lejeune

  Join us for Kulturfolger's fourth session of Thema Talks with Quentin Lejeune. ABOUT Assessing by how much human activities have brought our climate outside of its natural variations - which would « commonly » be observed if we humans weren’t here - has become a raison d’être for many climate scientists. One phenomenon that they have noticed over the last decades is that one can observe more and more leaves at the surface of the Earth, and this is understood as a response to human activities. This “uncommon bloom” is certainly fascinating as a scientific fact. But since our relationship to climate change is rarely neutral, depending on our sensibilities we may perceive this fact differently – somewhere between a profanation and an opportunity. BIO Quentin LEJEUNE Born in 1990, grew up in Normandy, France. Since last year he holds a PhD in climate science from ETH Zürich. He is currently pursuing research in the same institute, focusing on the past and future climatic impacts of changes in land-use, especially deforestation and the expansion of agriculture. He likes to study and discuss the topic and climate change from multiple perspectives: scientific, but also political (for example through his commitment in an NGO with which he attended the international climate negotiations), as well as economic and philosophical positions.  

 

Join us for Kulturfolger's fourth session of Thema Talks with Quentin Lejeune.

ABOUT

Assessing by how much human activities have brought our climate outside of its natural variations - which would « commonly » be observed if we humans weren’t here - has become a raison d’être for many climate scientists.

One phenomenon that they have noticed over the last decades is that one can observe more and more leaves at the surface of the Earth, and this is understood as a response to human activities. This “uncommon bloom” is certainly fascinating as a scientific fact. But since our relationship to climate change is rarely neutral, depending on our sensibilities we may perceive this fact differently – somewhere between a profanation and an opportunity.

BIO
Quentin LEJEUNE
Born in 1990, grew up in Normandy, France.
Since last year he holds a PhD in climate science from ETH Zürich. He is currently pursuing research in the same institute, focusing on the past and future climatic impacts of changes in land-use, especially deforestation and the expansion of agriculture. He likes to study and discuss the topic and climate change from multiple perspectives: scientific, but also political (for example through his commitment in an NGO with which he attended the international climate negotiations), as well as economic and philosophical positions.

 

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May
20
to Jun 18

Uncommon Bloom/Vernissage

Uncommon Bloom(n.)

\ˌən-ˈkä-mən ˈblüm \

Fascination, rarity, beauty, decoration charged with meaning and history, an algal bloom and a flowering plant, the difference between genders and anatomy, the gap between lovers, the ephemerality of life and of death, an object of desire enforcing theiving, distillation, and preservation, models of growth, geography and economy, the heroes and the villains, the icons and the antigonists,  the aliens and the natives, a plethora of translations, multiple layers and multiple natures...

Imagine a botanist’s daydream… this dream transcends time and space and includes the fine details of a horticultural love affair. Do these plant lovers  delight in the miniature monkeys or ballerinas embodied by an orchid? Or of capturing the essence of an orange blossom?  Do they dream of maidens lavishly adorned with potato flowers? Or do they fulfill their unaddressed sexual fantasies through the intimate exploration of stamens and pistils?  Do they imagine drifting off on a mossy bulbs of green or to the rustle of palm leaves whilst laying in tropical sands, or is it rather, their desire of the detailed delicacies- small gems of fascination, curiously perpetuated by a bloom?

A flower, a bloom - a strange creature, if not nutritious or medicinal – than a divine gift, sign, symbol, decadence, or decoration. The multitude of floral patterns seem to play the role of signatories, arriving as if to say, “we approve, we attend, we adorn, enhance--lavish ourselves"! on this exquisite setting. The symbolism of flowers in art has established a cannon, yielding a kind of Floriography. For thousands of years, different articulations of nature, and in this case flowers, have been made, whether through science, poetry, or classification. In essence a history.

In the Renaissance, the strangeness of flowers was a spectacle, a ‘show’ with the arrangement of things on a ‘table’. Henry VIII, surrounded himself with lilac blooms just for the pleasure of the intoxicating smell. Amusement of floriculture fastly spread over Great Britain, and in 19th century, a placebo for boredom, and lush gardens became a haven from the trials of life, a mediation for the ladies in their private domain, where men were not allowed.

In the 18th century, when Linnaeus began to classify and create order, he was accused of  denying god. One obscene creation was the Horologicum Florae, a clock constructed of three categories of blooms, the Meteorici that open and close with the weather, the Tropici which follow the changing hours of daylight, and the Aequinoctales, which  “open precisely at a certain hour of the day and generally shut up every day at a determinate hour.” It was a true love, a utopian phantasm of painstaking order.

Alexander von Humboldt (18c.) followed his bliss and hunger for flowers, when world travel was ensued only as necessity. How did his passion inspire patrons to fund his endless search forbeauty? Were they aware in would result in the science of bio geography? Did his tropical flowers and ideas of the cosmos allude to a deep seated need for totality of the world?

 Pliny the Elder (77 AD.) on the thresholds of Classical rationality, dreamt with the gods of an order inclusive of art and morality.  Did his mistrust the ephemerality of flowers, lead him to obsessively define life through his fear of death? Rousseu (18th century) wrote copious letters of elegant pedagogical prose, inspiring  the wonder of the botanical world to a patron’s daughter.  The letters did not contain a single word of Latin. Rather than memorizing classifications, she could learn about the plants and flowers while she held the plant in hand, through his delicate and realistic descriptions. Jane C. Loudon,(19th century) was similar as she emancipated the garden from classification and into the hands of the feminine. 

Cesalpino and Ghini (16th century) desired to preserve this extravagant preciousness, or solidify the anima (soul) of the plant through their hortus seccus (herbarium), under the aegis of botanical science? If not for their desire for knowledge, perhaps they were interested in a new way of connecting things both to the eye and to discourse. In this case a new history.

Things are never as they seem. The complexity of the world does not suddenly increase, it never does.  Nature doesn’t abruptly become dense, obscure, and blurry- it is our ever changing interpretations of nature, and our desire to classify it for a specific comprehension and the mechanisms of history, in which we must go from wide to narrow. It was, as Foucault reminds us - necessary for History to become Natural, if only for our human understanding. The (Somnambulist ) botanist writing was perhaps a response to be able to describe this inexplicable strange richness, which may have been present all along.

Natural history, a precursor to science, traces only “objective” reality,  in order to placate our need to know, name, recognize and understand through a systematic lens. Yet, when symbolism crosses with history, an uncommon thing occurs: a botanist daydream, a queer celebration, alchemy of things and matter overlap, a taxonomy of useless beauty is created- We crave understanding and reality, yet we also enjoy wallowing in myth and dreamlike states.

 

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May
5
10:30am10:30am

Quote Club

Join us for the forth session of Quote Club where we will delve into different readings of BLOOM. We will read excerpts from texts by Gregory Bateson, Georges Bataille, Roland Barthes, Clarice Lispector and others. Excerpts from selected texts will be provided in the space. The session will start at 19.30 Uhr.

Join us for the forth session of Quote Club where we will delve into different readings of BLOOM. We will read excerpts from texts by Gregory Bateson, Georges Bataille, Roland Barthes, Clarice Lispector and others. Excerpts from selected texts will be provided in the space.
The session will start at 19.30 Uhr.

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Apr
26
7:30pm 7:30pm

Performance: Dominic Oppliger

ABOUT: My mother tongue is swiss german. I grew up twenty minutes from Zurich and have been working and living within the city borders for more than ten years. Though close, my dialect hasn't fully become the one of Zurich native. I try, and I get close, but also, I fail. When I speak to my baby daughter, I speak in the tongue of my mother who is from Lucerne. I keep switching between dialects like a schizophrenic, depending on who I'm talking to. For a while now, I am writing songtexts and prose in my dialect. Zurich natives correct my writing all the time. I never said I'm writing in züritütsch. I feel, I'm very much in between languages. To note an only spoken language — can it be seen as a translation? Translating sounds into written words. The person noting is confronted with the letters and sounds of another language. The notation of the spoken language never seems to achieve the state of settlement of an actual spoken and written language. BIO: Dominic Oppliger, 1983, is currently doing his master studies in transdisciplinary studies at zhdk, and has been a musician with doomenfels, yakari, the legendary lightness, etc. He's gardening for a half-living and for some years now, has been writing and performing in his swiss german mother tongue.    

ABOUT:

My mother tongue is swiss german. I grew up twenty minutes from Zurich and have been working and living within the city borders for more than ten years. Though close, my dialect hasn't fully become the one of Zurich native. I try, and I get close, but also, I fail. When I speak to my baby daughter, I speak in the tongue of my mother who is from Lucerne. I keep switching between dialects like a schizophrenic, depending on who I'm talking to. For a while now, I am writing songtexts and prose in my dialect. Zurich natives correct my writing all the time. I never said I'm writing in züritütsch. I feel, I'm very much in between languages. To note an only spoken language — can it be seen as a translation? Translating sounds into written words. The person noting is confronted with the letters and sounds of another language. The notation of the spoken language never seems to achieve the state of settlement of an actual spoken and written language.

BIO:

Dominic Oppliger, 1983, is currently doing his master studies in transdisciplinary studies at zhdk, and has been a musician with doomenfels, yakari, the legendary lightness, etc. He's gardening for a half-living and for some years now, has been writing and performing in his swiss german mother tongue.

 

 

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Apr
22
7:30pm 7:30pm

Thema Talk: Piero Good

Alternative Communication Technologies in the Mountains -A research in progress… Isolated in the mountains, one merges and familiarises with the trees, rocks, snow and animals to survive. This talk describes how the sun and strange instruments were utilised in ancient times to translate and disseminate information. Knowledge about strategic positions, weather phenomenas and physical processes were crucial and still are today for communication.

Alternative Communication Technologies in the Mountains -A research in progress…

Isolated in the mountains, one merges and familiarises with the trees, rocks, snow and animals to survive. This talk describes how the sun and strange instruments were utilised in ancient times to translate and disseminate information. Knowledge about strategic positions, weather phenomenas and physical processes were crucial and still are today for communication.

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Apr
12
7:00pm 7:00pm

Quote Club

Join us for the third session of Quote Club where we will delve into different readings of TRANSLATION. We will read excerpts from texts by Walter Benjamin, Donna Haraway, Gregory Bateson, Jhumpa Lahiri and others. Excerpts from selected texts will be provided in the space. The session will start at 19 Uhr.

Join us for the third session of Quote Club where we will delve into different readings of TRANSLATION. We will read excerpts from texts by Walter Benjamin, Donna Haraway, Gregory Bateson, Jhumpa Lahiri and others. Excerpts from selected texts will be provided in the space.
The session will start at 19 Uhr.

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Mar
24
7:30pm 7:30pm

Performance: The Catalyst & Film Screening: Delicatessen (1991)

CatCave9 is a monthly improvisational theatre show by The Catalyst, based in Lausanne, Switzerland. They are a group of scientific researchers from Université de Lausanne and Ecole polytechnique fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), aiming to combine science and theatrical improvisation.
The Catalyst will present a long form improvised story inspired by the exhibition.


FILM SCREENING: DELICATESSEN (1991), 21.00 UHR
Delicatessen is a French 1991 post-apocalyptic black comedy film directed by Jean-Pierre Jeunet and Marc Caro, starring Dominique Pinon and Karin Viard.

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Mar
22
7:00pm 7:00pm

Thema Talk: David Schildberger

Nudged Viands

Some say it’s clear: we missed a tempting opportunity to live in the lap of luxury. We grounded ourselves and assented to only having one nature to live in. Now we feel obliged to take care of this nature, as its resources are finite, and any escape from it seems not even worth considering yet. That was the beginning, and a myth has taken its course.

This talk will explore ways towards novel natures by indexing concepts in a manner that scaffolds them such as to host, in staging, characterizations yet to come.— Castoff viands opening up digestible worlds: starters that make us eager to do more, from necessity to luxury. Play around. Discover. Taste. A nudged architectonics, “...yet which preserves its form for a time in and through the flow that destroys it ... the process is life itself” (Michel Serres).

BIO:

David Schildberger is a researcher and PhD candidate at the ETH Zürich (Chair for Computer Aided Architectural Design) and the ZHAW Wädenswil (Centre for Ingredient and Beverage Research). His research focuses on the architectonics of artificial delicacies in relation to land- and cityscapes. He holds a Master of Advanced Studies degree in Computer Aided Architectural Design from ETH Zurich, graduated from the University of Innsbruck / Austria in Architecture and the University of Applied Sciences Rosenheim / Germany in Interior Design.

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Thema Talk: Jorge Orozco
Feb
22
7:00pm 7:00pm

Thema Talk: Jorge Orozco

Parasites on the Web. Computational objects operating digital collectives.

 

We parasite each other and live amidst parasites, Serres argues. We interrupt, endanger and corrupt; but also invent, order and consolidate. We switch hosts and guests, gifts and debts, objects and subjects. We make noise, but the noise makes us; this is the new logic, the logic of the collective. This talk shares a personal and optimist view on programmatic talks to collectives on the web. It celebrates parasitism in the digital age.

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